• Kasich & the Ohio Budget

    by  • December 18, 2009 • Uncategorized

    Last night, John Kasich released his first statement on Ohio’s budget.

    Here it is in its entirety:

    As I have traveled the state over the past three years, it has been clear to me that the people of Ohio understand that raising taxes is counter-productive to job creation and economic growth. The most prosperous states are the ones that are constantly reforming and restructuring, and not raising taxes.

    Today’s agreement is strictly stopgap, and turns a blind eye to the massive shortfalls we will face during the next budget cycle. We better have new leadership and new ideas in place by then. Our state’s future depends on it.

    For far too long Ohio has been stuck in a cycle of tax and spend. Hard choices continue to be pushed off to another day. And today, with this agreement between the Governor and the legislature, we are continuing the cycle and culture of tax and spend. It is a cycle I intend to break.

    Love the last paragraph.

    But some have complained about Kasich not putting his stamp on the budget process and providing his input, particularly considering his experience as Chairman of the U.S. House Budget Committee. As you likely recall, Kasich served as the chief architect of the nation’s first balanced budget since 1969. To put that into some perspective, next year’s congressional overspending is expected to surpass $1.5 trillion.

    So, considering this background, why didn’t Kasich get involved?

    Simple.

    He hasn’t been elected yet.

    Elections are done for a reason – for the people to have their say about who they want managing their government.

    If Kasich got involved it would have politicized the process far beyond where it’s stood the past several months. And that wouldn’t be fair to the elected officials involved or the people of Ohio.

    Now, as appropriate, Kasich has provided his first comment upon completion of the budget. It highlights his hope to reform state government to make it more efficient, lower the tax burden, and make Ohio more attractive to businesses.

    Over the coming months we’ll be hearing the details about how Kasich plans to govern Ohio. I’d expect a timeframe similar to Strickland’s in 2006 where the rollout began in the spring. Seeing as I don’t recall much griping from the left about not having time to study Strickland’s plans back then, I’m sure we can expect the same patience from them when it comes to Kasich’s rollout.

    Riiiiiiiight.

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